BIO/MEMOIR

THURS/4/22 :: 6:00p
Memoir: Rebuilding Life After Loss

Bookseller: {pages} a bookstore

Acclaimed memoirist and writing teacher Emily Rapp Black, creator of the Emmy Award–winning New York Times column Life, Interrupted, Suleika Jaouad, and L.A. Times Book Prize finalist in Science & Technology and MIT professor, Sara Seager, join author/editor Dinah Lenney to share their stories of love, loss and healing. 

MODERATOR

Dinah Lenney

Dinah Lenney is the author of The Object Parade and Bigger than Life: A Murder, a Memoir, and co-editor of Brief Encounters: A Collection of Contemporary Nonfiction. She serves as core faculty in the Bennington Writing Seminars, and as an editor-at-large for LARB. Her latest book, Coffee, was published in 2020.

 

PARTICIPANTS

Emily Rapp Black

Emily Rapp Black is the bestselling author of Poster Child: A Memoir; The Still Point of the Turning World; Sanctuary: A Memoir; and Frida Kahlo and My Left Leg (forthcoming June 2021). A former Guggenheim Fellow, she is Associate Professor of Creative Writing at UC-Riverside, where she also teaches in the School of Medicine.

BOOKSELLER

{pages} a bookstore

Please support our local bookseller for this panel. Signed bookplates will be available from most authors. Purchase HERE.

 

Suleika Jaouad

Suleika Jaouad wrote the Emmy Award–winning New York Times column Life, Interrupted. Her essays and feature stories have appeared in The New York Times Magazine and Vogue and on NPR. She is also the creator of the Isolation Journals, a global project cultivating creativity and community during challenging times. Between Two Kingdoms is her first book.

 

Sara Seager

Sara Seager is an astrophysicist and a professor of physics and planetary science at MIT. Her research, which earned her a MacArthur Foundation “Genius” grant, has introduced many foundational ideas to the field of exoplanets, and she led NASA’s Probe-class study team for the Starshade project. She is now at the forefront of the search for the first Earth-like exoplanets and signs of life on them. Her memoir, The Smallest Lights in the Universe, is a finalist for the L.A. Times Book Prize in Science & Technology. She lives with her family in Concord, Massachusetts.